053 — Gregory Offner Helps Businesses of All Sizes Learn How to Make Work Suck Less and Grow Your Business

Gregory Offner was a world-renown dueling piano performer who just happened to also have a 15-year career leading sales and marketing efforts for some of the world's largest companies.

Then tragedy struck.

Five years and 15 surgeries later, Gregory transformed both his voice and his life.

Today, as an award-winning keynote performer, Gregory helps organizations and the people within them elevate the experience of work and use piano bar secrets to inspire their people, amplify teamwork & collaboration, and build organizations full of highly fulfilled, high-performing people.

He discovered his perspectives on navigating change, and his passion for creating experiences that 'rock' could serve, inspire, and delight audiences around the world.

The use of music in his programs (as a metaphor for engagement and resilience) connects with audiences in a deep and unforgettable performance; leaving them refreshed and equipped with skills to reframe obstacles as opportunities.

His programs have broad appeal and can be customized to suit events with a diverse mix of roles and responsibilities in the audience, as well as for audiences composed mainly of leaders.

In today's episode, Christina and Gregory talk about how he puts the focus on growth above everything else when he works with an organization. In the process, he focuses more on bettering the organization than growing the people.

Questions

  • What if all of your employees were efficient, eager and effective?
  • What would your business look like?
  • How do we create an engagement economy in a traditional work environment?

Links and Resources

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For more entrepreneurial insight, subscribe & join our community at etatoday.zone & learn how to build a business that enables your lifestyle instead of taking over your life.

Read Full Transcript

WEBVTT

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- Hey, busy business people.

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I am here today with another entrepreneur

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taking action, Gregory Offner.

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Gregory helps businesses of all sizes

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learn how to make work suck
less and grow your business.

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I'm getting the scoop
today on how he does it,

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so stay tuned.

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(upbeat music)

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Okay, so I know Work Sucks is
something that you believe.

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Can we kinda start there and
elaborate on that a little bit?

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- Sure.

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- I think the best place to
start is to look at the current

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common catalog of pop music.

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Christina, if I asked you

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to point to a song about
work being awesome,

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what song would you point to?

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I'm not gonna make you awkward pause.

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There probably aren't any,

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but if I asked you to point
to a song about work sucking,

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you'd probably tell me about
Dolly Parton's nine to five

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or about that country
song called shift work.

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That's right, folks.

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I said shift work, not the other.

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It's clearly in our common vernacular,

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this idea that work as an institution.

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Maybe not your work,

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but work the way we think
of it generally, work sucks.

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And given the opportunity,
most people would rather not.

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I've heard of people
who actually schedule,

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get this Christina,

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they schedule dentist appointments

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when they know they're
supposed to be at work.

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If you'd rather be at
the dentist than at work,

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that says something about the quality

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of the experience we're having at work.

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So yeah, it's pretty commonly
accepted that work sucks

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and I'm on a mission to
take the irk out of work,

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because I believe that work
should be a place where we go

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and become our best selves.

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Solve the world's most

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challenging and pressing problems.

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There is no organization
on the face of the planet

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that is more effective at solving problems

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than a consciously and
ethically run business.

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Nonprofits aren't better.

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The government clearly ain't better.

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There is no organization
that's more capable

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of affecting change on
our planet than business.

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But I think we've built many
of these businesses backwards.

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- Yep, especially in America.

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I was talking with somebody
about that the other

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day that it's like businesses

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have become our social safety net.

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And it's like, they're the
ones that help people grow,

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that help people live their lives,

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that help them make the
money that they wanna make,

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that help them save for retirement,

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help them put their kids through college.

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Businesses are the social
safety net and we have more

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responsibility than we could
ever imagine as entrepreneurs.

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Things like choosing
what healthcare packages

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I'm going to offer.

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Choosing to even offer
healthcare and the impact

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that that's gonna have on someone's life

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and their ability to
take care of themselves

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and take care of their families.

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It's a huge responsibility.

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We really have to take our employees

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and their lives seriously.

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And I think that's something that it's,

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it's a lot to think
about as an entrepreneur.

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'Cause we're just like, hey,
I just wanna go market people.

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I just wanna go build websites.

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I wanna go write brand messaging.

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I wanna just go do the thing

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that I'm really passionate about.

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But meanwhile, there's a whole separate

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side of your business where you

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have to care about your employees

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and feel that's something that people

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don't think about a lot.

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- Well, and that's a two
way street, Christina.

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It is important and it is a responsibility

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of an entrepreneur, of a business owner,

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to care about their people.

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And I make an intentional choice

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when I say businesses
don't have employees,

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businesses employ people.

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I try to get my clients
out of this mindset

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that they have some sort of ownership

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or right or entitlement
to their employees time.

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They are people you employ.

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They are not your employees.

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But that street goes both ways, as I said,

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and we do have a situation right now

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where many employees show up and turn off

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and so if that street's
gonna work both ways,

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the employee needs to be
invested in some aspect

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of the impact that business makes.

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Gary Vaynerchuk says it very well.

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If you're the business owner
and you expect your employees

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to care about your business,
like you do, you're crazy.

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- Yeah.

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- No one will care about
your business like you do.

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No one will care about
your health like you do.

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No one will care about your
personal boundaries like you do.

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But when we look at the
employee/employer relationship,

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it's a two-way street.

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And I think that street has been closed

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and God willing under construction.

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That's what we hope, not
just closed and broken,

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but hopefully it's at
least under construction

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in many businesses for too long.

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And so we've stopped
thinking that that street

00:05:06.060 --> 00:05:08.610
is a viable form of transportation.

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Again, Dolly says nine to five,

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what a way to make a living.

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Barely getting by.

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It's all taken and no given.

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They use your mind.

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They never give you credit.

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It's enough to drive
you crazy if you let it.

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And what I love about
her perspective on work

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is that in her song,

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she's really giving, she's
committed to the employer,

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but what she's not seeing is traction.

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She's not seeing progress.

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She's not seeing perhaps impact.

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That's really what demotivates and stops

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many of our employees in their tracks,

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is when we as business leaders,

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don't create an environment
in which they can see

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and feel the impact of what they're doing.

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There's a best selling book out there

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called bullshit jobs.

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That defines a BS job, right?

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As a job for which there
is no tangible outcome

00:06:05.460 --> 00:06:08.580
to the person who's doing the job.

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Meaning if I show up and I send 50 emails

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or I show up and I send one
email, it doesn't matter.

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It's like you're pressing a
button that leads to nowhere,

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a button that's attached to nothing.

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And we're, collectively we,

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we are sick of that type of work.

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- Yeah.

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- So the employee owes it to the employer

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to find a way to create
an impact every day.

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But the employer owes it to the employee

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to make that impact meaningful.

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- Yeah.

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- And like culture code
and stuff, isn't enough.

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That's just not enough to
make that kind of impact.

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I see people all the time like,

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oh, we're gonna create our core values

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and we're gonna build a culture code.

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And then it becomes a dead document.

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Like they don't implement that.

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They're not like true to the
culture inside of the company,

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true to like all the
promises that you've made

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to your employees and
communicating their value

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inside the company.

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I think, especially as
we've gone more remote,

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like we're inside of people's lives

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as employers in a way
that we never were before,

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if I'm on a zoom call with my team,

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I'm gonna see their pets and their kids

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and their husbands in the background.

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And that's something
that if they were coming

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into the office,

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we would see if they
chose to talk about it.

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But it's not something that
we would normally be part of.

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Now we're in people's living rooms.

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We're in their kitchens.

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We're in their bedrooms.

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And it's like, there's such a,

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kind of almost a violation and
a responsibility to be more

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human in our interactions, I feel like.

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One of the things we even
did was implement virtual

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offices in Gather Town.

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And one of the coolest
things of that was just like,

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I had employees on my team

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that I very rarely ever talked to.

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They did the work and it was good.

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And you know, there wasn't a
whole lot of reason to talk.

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So I didn't really talk to them.

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When we started implementing that

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in Gather Town and everybody
actually had a virtual

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office and I can actually see people

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in their office working.

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I can see them going over and
meeting with other people,

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I felt a lot more connected to my team

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and they felt a lot more connected

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to the business and the mission.

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And we were able to start
doing weekly staff meetings

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and I hold regular office hours

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where they can just pop in and ask

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questions and little things
like that it was just,

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it was fascinating to me to
see like how they decorated

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their offices and to
actually see them working,

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even when it's virtual,

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like there was so much
in their personality

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and how they decorated their office even.

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It was just fascinating to me.

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- So I don't know much about Gather Town,

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but I guess it's sort
of like a virtual world

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where you can set up office space.

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- Yep.

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- So how do you see the employee working?

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- You see their avatar.

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So they're not on video,

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they're not on camera unless you

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actually walk up to them.

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And then you can, if
they're in another tab

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and not like on Gather Town,

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then it'll give you the
option to kinda ring them

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and say like, hey, somebody
wants to talk to you,

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but it doesn't invade their privacy

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'cause you're not seeing their camera.

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You're not listening to their microphone

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without their permission
or anything like that.

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You just see their avatar
sitting in the office.

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And then if they walk
over into another office,

00:09:04.950 --> 00:09:06.660
you can see their little avatar character

00:09:06.660 --> 00:09:09.960
kind of like Minecraft
kind of looking video game.

00:09:09.960 --> 00:09:11.910
You can see their character
go over into someone else's

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office and you'll see little chat bubbles

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up above 'em as they're speaking.

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It's really interesting

00:09:18.660 --> 00:09:21.224
and they can decorate their own space.

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When you have physical office space,

00:09:22.057 --> 00:09:23.280
people would bring tchotchke from home

00:09:23.280 --> 00:09:26.010
and decorate their desk
and things like that.

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One person in our office says,

00:09:27.300 --> 00:09:30.030
when you have a desk there's just pillows.

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That's where they sit and
work is on a pile of pillows.

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- That would ruin my back.

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But if that is what they enjoy that's.

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I'm fascinated by this idea
because there is a lot of truth

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to the social connection
that work creates.

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For many people the last
time they were around as many

00:09:52.410 --> 00:09:55.230
people as they are in the
office was in college.

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And so if you're not going to the office,

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there's this whole social chunk

00:10:01.494 --> 00:10:03.690
that we look or that we need to replicate

00:10:03.690 --> 00:10:06.590
and this isn't something that's
gonna be solved overnight.

00:10:07.877 --> 00:10:11.730
But the office as a social gathering place

00:10:11.730 --> 00:10:16.730
is a very interesting
microcosm for me to look at.

00:10:17.100 --> 00:10:19.260
I almost wanted to call
it a double edged sword

00:10:19.260 --> 00:10:21.660
because yeah, you get that connection,

00:10:21.660 --> 00:10:24.180
but there's a study that
shows it takes human beings

00:10:24.180 --> 00:10:28.500
on average 23 minutes to
refocus after an interruption.

00:10:28.500 --> 00:10:29.333
- Yeah.

00:10:29.333 --> 00:10:32.250
- And the average office worker
reports being interrupted

00:10:32.250 --> 00:10:34.830
between eight and 11 times a day.

00:10:34.830 --> 00:10:36.810
- Well, I mean, you do the math.

00:10:36.810 --> 00:10:39.333
They're never focused in that respect.

00:10:40.542 --> 00:10:43.330
So being able to be in our own environment

00:10:46.201 --> 00:10:49.020
without either a virtual
office or a real office

00:10:49.020 --> 00:10:51.240
and focus on the work at hand,

00:10:51.240 --> 00:10:53.160
allows us to get in,

00:10:53.160 --> 00:10:55.890
get it done and get out.

00:10:55.890 --> 00:10:57.630
And I think what we'll start to see

00:10:57.630 --> 00:10:59.380
over the next several years is that

00:11:00.237 --> 00:11:03.810
as folks get adjusted to working remotely,

00:11:03.810 --> 00:11:07.740
they start to say, "My
coworkers are lovely people,

00:11:07.740 --> 00:11:09.720
but I get to set up
shop at the coffee house

00:11:09.720 --> 00:11:11.168
for two hours a day.

00:11:11.168 --> 00:11:12.150
And I've got friends that I meet there."

00:11:12.150 --> 00:11:13.980
So I'm interested in actually walking over

00:11:13.980 --> 00:11:16.290
to this table and I
don't wanna come across

00:11:16.290 --> 00:11:19.020
as though I'm judging one or
the other as better, I'm not.

00:11:19.020 --> 00:11:21.000
I'm just saying that now there are more

00:11:21.000 --> 00:11:23.550
options available to us
and I'm excited to see

00:11:23.550 --> 00:11:26.384
how they develop and evolve

00:11:26.384 --> 00:11:28.410
and people will gravitate towards.

00:11:28.410 --> 00:11:31.110
I personally working from home 24/7,

00:11:31.110 --> 00:11:33.420
unless I'm on the road
in front of clients.

00:11:33.420 --> 00:11:37.320
I often daydream about being
in an office from time to time.

00:11:37.320 --> 00:11:39.450
I kind of miss it a little bit,

00:11:39.450 --> 00:11:41.190
but I'd like it on my terms.

00:11:41.190 --> 00:11:42.690
And so I think for somebody like me,

00:11:42.690 --> 00:11:45.210
a co-working space becomes attractive.

00:11:45.210 --> 00:11:46.530
There are folks who,

00:11:46.530 --> 00:11:48.780
have distributed teams all over the world.

00:11:48.780 --> 00:11:51.660
So the only way they're
gonna get together is perhaps

00:11:51.660 --> 00:11:54.510
a virtual office space
like you're talking about.

00:11:54.510 --> 00:11:56.190
And then there are the folks who've been

00:11:56.190 --> 00:11:58.170
waiting for this moment

00:11:58.170 --> 00:11:59.617
and the minute COVID happened, they said,

00:11:59.617 --> 00:12:01.290
"Oh, thank you, Jesus Lord."

00:12:01.290 --> 00:12:04.620
I don't have to go into that
terrible place ever again.

00:12:04.620 --> 00:12:09.330
And they're just so
excited to be at home 24/7.

00:12:09.330 --> 00:12:11.287
My dad said this when
I was younger, he said,

00:12:11.287 --> 00:12:14.190
"Greg, there's a bolt for every screw,

00:12:14.190 --> 00:12:16.410
meaning that for someone's
interest or personality,

00:12:16.410 --> 00:12:18.610
there's something out
there that fits them."

00:12:20.550 --> 00:12:23.760
But that idea of coming in,

00:12:23.760 --> 00:12:26.373
accomplishing a task and leaving,

00:12:27.810 --> 00:12:30.240
that is an important
component of this discussion

00:12:30.240 --> 00:12:33.000
around work sucking and why it sucks.

00:12:33.000 --> 00:12:34.238
- Yeah,

00:12:34.238 --> 00:12:35.670
- Because for a very long time,

00:12:35.670 --> 00:12:37.230
I'm over 40 years old.

00:12:37.230 --> 00:12:39.960
So certainly as long as I've been alive

00:12:39.960 --> 00:12:42.120
work was measured by when
you got to the office

00:12:42.120 --> 00:12:43.290
and when you left.

00:12:43.290 --> 00:12:45.540
Unless you carried a quota, right?

00:12:45.540 --> 00:12:48.060
If you were in sales, then you
could say, I've hit my quota.

00:12:48.060 --> 00:12:50.640
So I'm done, I'll be on
the golf course, you know?

00:12:50.640 --> 00:12:53.790
But otherwise you showed up at eight,

00:12:53.790 --> 00:12:56.820
you clocked out at five
and I mean, that was it,

00:12:56.820 --> 00:12:59.100
especially prior to the
internet, that was it.

00:12:59.100 --> 00:13:02.280
When I'm not at the office,
I am not at the office.

00:13:02.280 --> 00:13:05.580
And then the internet happened
and the line between when

00:13:05.580 --> 00:13:09.060
we're at the office and
when we're not, got blurry.

00:13:09.060 --> 00:13:10.350
And then smartphones happened

00:13:10.350 --> 00:13:13.170
and that line just vanished all together.

00:13:13.170 --> 00:13:14.610
And it was constant,

00:13:14.610 --> 00:13:17.163
but intermittent work that
we were expected to do.

00:13:18.240 --> 00:13:20.490
But for people who didn't
have a finish line, right?

00:13:20.490 --> 00:13:22.394
They didn't have a quota.

00:13:22.394 --> 00:13:23.973
They didn't know I'm done.

00:13:24.990 --> 00:13:27.243
What's the incentive to work any faster?

00:13:28.230 --> 00:13:31.440
So at this point, it's now
a wait out the clock game.

00:13:31.440 --> 00:13:34.560
How many years do I have
to do this same routine

00:13:34.560 --> 00:13:37.950
until I can say, I'm
done working, if at all.

00:13:37.950 --> 00:13:40.290
Many people don't have that luxury.

00:13:40.290 --> 00:13:42.393
And given that perspective,

00:13:43.350 --> 00:13:45.649
work seems like a prison sentence.

00:13:45.649 --> 00:13:49.170
30 years, 40 years
making just enough to pay

00:13:49.170 --> 00:13:50.520
the mortgage, the car note.

00:13:50.520 --> 00:13:52.950
Most of what people
make is a pass through,

00:13:52.950 --> 00:13:54.960
if you really think about
it like a business owner,

00:13:54.960 --> 00:13:57.210
and I know your listeners are,

00:13:57.210 --> 00:14:00.600
most people spend 20% to 50%,

00:14:00.600 --> 00:14:03.250
in some cases much more of their income

00:14:04.290 --> 00:14:05.760
on their home or where you know,

00:14:05.760 --> 00:14:07.020
where they're living.

00:14:07.020 --> 00:14:12.020
They spend around 10% to
20% on transportation costs.

00:14:12.240 --> 00:14:16.500
So now we're near 70% of
your income already gone

00:14:16.500 --> 00:14:19.500
the first of every month
before you've even received it.

00:14:19.500 --> 00:14:21.660
And then you've got groceries
and we can call these

00:14:21.660 --> 00:14:23.760
discretionary expenses, but you gotta eat.

00:14:23.760 --> 00:14:25.560
You gotta wear clothes.

00:14:25.560 --> 00:14:29.070
So 90% to 95% of what people make

00:14:29.070 --> 00:14:31.570
is already gone before it
hits their bank account.

00:14:34.640 --> 00:14:36.273
So I gotta do this for 30 years?

00:14:37.350 --> 00:14:39.403
Maybe I get 5% of my salary.

00:14:39.403 --> 00:14:41.700
- . Oh yeah, we forgot,

00:14:41.700 --> 00:14:44.793
Uncle Sam's taken 20% to 40%
depending on much you make.

00:14:46.470 --> 00:14:49.086
So one of the biggest
opportunities employers

00:14:49.086 --> 00:14:51.840
have in front of them right now,

00:14:51.840 --> 00:14:53.430
is to think long and hard

00:14:53.430 --> 00:14:57.480
about how to evaluate what work means,

00:14:57.480 --> 00:15:00.540
what accomplishing a day's work means

00:15:00.540 --> 00:15:01.790
for the average employee.

00:15:02.670 --> 00:15:03.930
We're not gonna see innovation

00:15:03.930 --> 00:15:06.303
until there's an incentive
to finish faster.

00:15:08.520 --> 00:15:11.160
What would it look like if people

00:15:11.160 --> 00:15:15.063
other than those in sales
roles had daily quotas?

00:15:16.410 --> 00:15:17.310
And I don't know the answer.

00:15:17.310 --> 00:15:19.740
It's a legitimate question for
your audience to think about,

00:15:19.740 --> 00:15:21.040
what would that look like?

00:15:22.958 --> 00:15:25.140
Because the organizations
who get that right,

00:15:25.140 --> 00:15:27.570
are going to be the ones
that are leading the future

00:15:27.570 --> 00:15:30.450
in terms of workplace
satisfaction, workplace engagement,

00:15:30.450 --> 00:15:31.653
worker productivity.

00:15:32.730 --> 00:15:36.090
Because the pandemic has
shown loud and clear.

00:15:36.090 --> 00:15:38.130
People are no longer willing

00:15:38.130 --> 00:15:42.000
to sell their life to a corporation.

00:15:42.000 --> 00:15:43.050
They're done.

00:15:43.050 --> 00:15:45.390
People are voting with their feet

00:15:45.390 --> 00:15:47.250
and what's fascinating is
over the last several years,

00:15:47.250 --> 00:15:49.800
we've seen the rise of the gig economy.

00:15:49.800 --> 00:15:51.540
I don't know if this is something
that's being talked about

00:15:51.540 --> 00:15:55.020
a lot in your network,
but certainly in my world,

00:15:55.020 --> 00:15:57.450
great talent is leaving
the traditional workforce

00:15:57.450 --> 00:15:58.713
for the gig economy.

00:15:59.820 --> 00:16:03.540
And as a musician, I've played
gigs all over the world.

00:16:03.540 --> 00:16:04.380
And I throw the term around.

00:16:04.380 --> 00:16:05.213
I got a gig here,

00:16:05.213 --> 00:16:07.050
got a gig there, gig gig, gig, gig gig,

00:16:07.050 --> 00:16:11.043
never really thought about
what that word meant.

00:16:12.210 --> 00:16:16.440
And so I looked it up and the term gig

00:16:16.440 --> 00:16:21.440
wasn't even really in our
vernacular until the 1920s.

00:16:21.630 --> 00:16:25.503
And then it exploded in
popularity and I wondered why.

00:16:26.490 --> 00:16:28.200
And I looked back and found that the term

00:16:28.200 --> 00:16:30.960
was used mostly by jazz musicians.

00:16:30.960 --> 00:16:31.793
Well, I'm a musician.

00:16:31.793 --> 00:16:32.760
So now I'm really interested.

00:16:32.760 --> 00:16:34.560
And I start digging in a
little deeper, Christina.

00:16:34.560 --> 00:16:37.680
What I learned was that prior to 1920,

00:16:37.680 --> 00:16:39.900
musicians called a gig something else.

00:16:39.900 --> 00:16:40.950
When they had a performance

00:16:40.950 --> 00:16:43.290
at Smokey Joe's Cafe in St. Louis

00:16:43.290 --> 00:16:45.120
or wherever they were performing,

00:16:45.120 --> 00:16:47.673
they called it an engagement.

00:16:49.830 --> 00:16:52.680
So gig is literally short for engagement,

00:16:52.680 --> 00:16:55.080
which means people are leaving
the traditional economy

00:16:55.080 --> 00:16:57.480
for the engagement economy.

00:16:57.480 --> 00:16:59.490
And when you think about what
it takes to be successful

00:16:59.490 --> 00:17:04.490
in the gig economy, you see
people who are fully engaged.

00:17:04.830 --> 00:17:08.310
If you're a GrubHub driver
and you are not efficient,

00:17:08.310 --> 00:17:10.140
you don't get more rides.

00:17:10.140 --> 00:17:12.090
You don't get more deliveries.

00:17:12.090 --> 00:17:14.910
If you are an Uber driver
and you are not eager

00:17:14.910 --> 00:17:18.243
to pick up passengers,
you get deplatformed.

00:17:19.200 --> 00:17:20.850
So you need to be efficient.

00:17:20.850 --> 00:17:22.170
You need to be eager.

00:17:22.170 --> 00:17:23.760
And you need to be effective.

00:17:23.760 --> 00:17:25.260
If you're business owner listening,

00:17:25.260 --> 00:17:26.520
what if all of your employees

00:17:26.520 --> 00:17:30.090
were efficient, eager and effective?

00:17:30.090 --> 00:17:32.670
What would your business look like?

00:17:32.670 --> 00:17:35.490
I imagine you're smiling
thinking about that right now,

00:17:35.490 --> 00:17:38.160
because it would look
pretty good, I think.

00:17:38.160 --> 00:17:40.080
And that's the challenge
that we have as leaders

00:17:40.080 --> 00:17:42.240
is how do we create an engagement economy

00:17:42.240 --> 00:17:43.940
in a traditional work environment?

00:17:45.180 --> 00:17:46.603
- Yeah, that's something that like me

00:17:46.603 --> 00:17:48.210
and one of my staff members

00:17:48.210 --> 00:17:50.340
was actually talking about just yesterday.

00:17:50.340 --> 00:17:51.243
Surprisingly.

00:17:52.590 --> 00:17:55.920
We were talking about how
photos and stuff like that.

00:17:55.920 --> 00:17:58.210
She came from the content writer world

00:17:59.633 --> 00:18:00.960
and they were constantly chasing gigs.

00:18:00.960 --> 00:18:02.670
They were constantly going after gigs.

00:18:02.670 --> 00:18:04.980
You had like certain number of like blogs

00:18:04.980 --> 00:18:06.870
you were supposed to write
or certain number of words

00:18:06.870 --> 00:18:08.760
you were supposed to write every day.

00:18:08.760 --> 00:18:10.290
And how that was just kinda,

00:18:10.290 --> 00:18:12.510
you learned how to be very
efficient with your time.

00:18:12.510 --> 00:18:14.130
So we started thinking about like,

00:18:14.130 --> 00:18:15.570
well, how do we attract more of those?

00:18:15.570 --> 00:18:18.246
'Cause some of our best
employees have been people

00:18:18.246 --> 00:18:21.660
that used to be in that rat
race, be in the gig economy.

00:18:21.660 --> 00:18:23.880
And they had learned how
to manage their time.

00:18:23.880 --> 00:18:25.080
They had learned how to be efficient.

00:18:25.080 --> 00:18:27.450
They had built systems for the
job that they needed to do.

00:18:27.450 --> 00:18:29.580
They had self started and did all that.

00:18:29.580 --> 00:18:30.480
Nobody had to teach them.

00:18:30.480 --> 00:18:31.740
They figured it out,

00:18:31.740 --> 00:18:34.440
but they were tired of chasing gigs.

00:18:34.440 --> 00:18:35.790
They wanted consistent work.

00:18:35.790 --> 00:18:38.460
They wanted to just do the
work and not have to constantly

00:18:38.460 --> 00:18:40.410
be going and like trying to find people

00:18:40.410 --> 00:18:41.460
to hire them for things.

00:18:41.460 --> 00:18:43.590
And that was the biggest
reason why they were attracted

00:18:43.590 --> 00:18:46.440
to us versus staying in that gig economy

00:18:46.440 --> 00:18:48.870
and those have been some
of our best employees.

00:18:48.870 --> 00:18:50.280
I feel like that's,

00:18:50.280 --> 00:18:51.870
if you can attract those self starters

00:18:51.870 --> 00:18:53.850
that like the gig work

00:18:53.850 --> 00:18:55.980
and then give them a place where
it still feels comfortable,

00:18:55.980 --> 00:18:57.720
they still have drive and stuff.

00:18:57.720 --> 00:18:59.610
That that can be really powerful.

00:18:59.610 --> 00:19:01.980
I hadn't really thought about
it the way you said it though,

00:19:01.980 --> 00:19:03.120
that it's like, yeah, if you just,

00:19:03.120 --> 00:19:05.070
just clocking in and
taking home a paycheck,

00:19:05.070 --> 00:19:06.273
isn't enough anymore.

00:19:07.470 --> 00:19:09.990
Just coming in every day
and like, that's your,

00:19:09.990 --> 00:19:13.440
Hey, I put in eight hours
today and that's your quota.

00:19:13.440 --> 00:19:14.733
That's not enough.

00:19:15.720 --> 00:19:17.250
- Hm, hm.

00:19:17.250 --> 00:19:19.560
- And what you just brought up,

00:19:19.560 --> 00:19:22.560
attracting gig workers who want

00:19:22.560 --> 00:19:26.910
perhaps a little more
stability or don't want to,

00:19:26.910 --> 00:19:30.180
I think in your words, don't
want to chase every gig.

00:19:30.180 --> 00:19:31.230
Yes.

00:19:31.230 --> 00:19:36.060
And it's important that we
understand what they're used to,

00:19:36.060 --> 00:19:37.890
which is when I chase the gig

00:19:37.890 --> 00:19:42.120
and I do the gig, I'm done the gig,

00:19:42.120 --> 00:19:43.710
because what we fall into the trap of

00:19:43.710 --> 00:19:46.650
or what we can potentially
fall into the trap of,

00:19:46.650 --> 00:19:48.180
is attracting those gig workers

00:19:48.180 --> 00:19:50.580
who have those skills and then giving them

00:19:50.580 --> 00:19:53.313
a never ending stream of stuff to do.

00:19:54.300 --> 00:19:58.530
See that's that's the
real crux of disengagement

00:19:58.530 --> 00:20:00.243
is that I'm never done.

00:20:01.595 --> 00:20:03.540
The 30 years, I'm never done.

00:20:03.540 --> 00:20:05.010
It just keeps coming.

00:20:05.010 --> 00:20:08.220
It just keeps coming and coming
and coming and I'm exhausted

00:20:08.220 --> 00:20:10.530
and I'm not getting
compensated if I do more,

00:20:10.530 --> 00:20:12.450
because you got me for eight hours.

00:20:12.450 --> 00:20:15.000
So all this efficiency that I developed,

00:20:15.000 --> 00:20:16.920
all this eagerness and effectiveness,

00:20:16.920 --> 00:20:18.360
you're just taking advantage of it.

00:20:18.360 --> 00:20:20.130
This is the imaginary you,
by the way, Christine,

00:20:20.130 --> 00:20:21.960
I'm not saying you personally.

00:20:21.960 --> 00:20:24.930
The employer is just taking
advantage of that efficiency.

00:20:24.930 --> 00:20:26.640
So there has got to be an incentive,

00:20:26.640 --> 00:20:29.310
a quota like system applied,

00:20:29.310 --> 00:20:32.790
which either allows the
employee to complete a certain

00:20:32.790 --> 00:20:36.570
amount of work and then
reclaim the day or the week

00:20:36.570 --> 00:20:38.760
or the quarter as their own

00:20:38.760 --> 00:20:41.820
or complete a certain amount of work

00:20:41.820 --> 00:20:44.640
and then continue to work for,

00:20:44.640 --> 00:20:46.440
I don't know, time and a half.

00:20:46.440 --> 00:20:49.061
Some sort of percentage bonus,

00:20:49.061 --> 00:20:51.761
some sort of impact bonus,
some sort of profitability.

00:20:52.650 --> 00:20:55.920
We've got to take
responsibility as leaders

00:20:55.920 --> 00:20:57.900
for solving this problem.

00:20:57.900 --> 00:20:59.940
We can't look at the employee and say,

00:20:59.940 --> 00:21:02.070
well, how would you do it?

00:21:02.070 --> 00:21:04.830
You don't get outta jail that
easy pal, you're the leader.

00:21:04.830 --> 00:21:07.650
This is our responsibility
to fix this problem.

00:21:07.650 --> 00:21:11.580
And so I challenge your
listeners to take this mantle,

00:21:11.580 --> 00:21:13.050
to step up to this challenge,

00:21:13.050 --> 00:21:17.760
because among your listeners
is someone with an idea burning

00:21:17.760 --> 00:21:20.430
in their mind right now they're
going, oh, oh, me, I got it.

00:21:20.430 --> 00:21:21.930
I got a great idea.

00:21:21.930 --> 00:21:23.550
Let's get that idea out into the world

00:21:23.550 --> 00:21:25.983
and share it and refine
it and build on it.

00:21:26.880 --> 00:21:28.920
We can fix this problem.

00:21:28.920 --> 00:21:32.640
When we approach challenges ethically

00:21:32.640 --> 00:21:34.590
and consciously as business leaders,

00:21:34.590 --> 00:21:37.773
we are ruthlessly efficient
at solving problems.

00:21:38.640 --> 00:21:39.840
But we gotta start.

00:21:39.840 --> 00:21:41.910
- Yeah, I know my brain
is already buzzing.

00:21:41.910 --> 00:21:43.320
One of the things we had debated

00:21:43.320 --> 00:21:46.830
was doing daily quotas, but
as I'm listening to you talk,

00:21:46.830 --> 00:21:49.710
I think weekly quotas
would be a lot sexier

00:21:49.710 --> 00:21:51.120
because it's like, hey,
this is what we need you

00:21:51.120 --> 00:21:52.710
to get done this week.

00:21:52.710 --> 00:21:55.110
Get it done whenever,
however you need to do it.

00:21:55.110 --> 00:21:58.020
If you can complete a week's
worth of work in three days,

00:21:58.020 --> 00:21:59.400
enjoy two days off.

00:21:59.400 --> 00:22:00.720
Go have fun.

00:22:00.720 --> 00:22:03.030
If you wanna do more work, yay, cool.

00:22:03.030 --> 00:22:04.620
Let's do more work.

00:22:04.620 --> 00:22:07.420
We already set our company
up a little bit differently

00:22:09.282 --> 00:22:11.220
where it's raises are based
on cost of living increases,

00:22:11.220 --> 00:22:13.350
'cause we know that has been nuts.

00:22:13.350 --> 00:22:15.870
So that keeps us competitive
in the job market.

00:22:15.870 --> 00:22:18.060
So there's not a reason to go like,

00:22:18.060 --> 00:22:21.210
go get a whole another job just
to be offered current salary

00:22:21.210 --> 00:22:23.310
when you should just be staying up to date

00:22:24.594 --> 00:22:26.010
and then performance for bonuses.

00:22:26.010 --> 00:22:27.180
So company performance,

00:22:27.180 --> 00:22:29.910
personal performance, how
are we doing for bonuses?

00:22:29.910 --> 00:22:33.240
So we had already set that up
to be a little bit different,

00:22:33.240 --> 00:22:36.240
but yeah, I like that idea of making sure

00:22:36.240 --> 00:22:38.840
that they get rewarded
for hitting their quotas

00:22:38.840 --> 00:22:40.140
in some way, shape, form, or fashion.

00:22:40.140 --> 00:22:41.163
And they're done.

00:22:42.210 --> 00:22:43.380
It's like, I would love that.

00:22:43.380 --> 00:22:44.670
I don't know why they wouldn't.

00:22:44.670 --> 00:22:46.350
So yeah, my brain's already buzzing

00:22:46.350 --> 00:22:47.310
with like a ton of different

00:22:47.310 --> 00:22:49.260
ideas and different ways
we could approach things

00:22:49.260 --> 00:22:50.093
and handle stuff.

00:22:50.093 --> 00:22:51.240
So I think that's really cool.

00:22:51.240 --> 00:22:52.073
I love it.

00:22:53.610 --> 00:22:57.870
So I know like what other
advice would you have

00:22:57.870 --> 00:22:59.250
for employers in terms

00:22:59.250 --> 00:23:00.870
of like how they manage their employee

00:23:00.870 --> 00:23:02.550
and help them become better

00:23:02.550 --> 00:23:05.703
and stay happy and actually get
work done and be productive?

00:23:07.590 --> 00:23:09.570
- Well, so I mentioned earlier

00:23:09.570 --> 00:23:11.070
that I was a musician and I spent

00:23:11.070 --> 00:23:15.480
time as a dueling piano
performer and one of the skills,

00:23:15.480 --> 00:23:18.750
maybe the most important skill
of someone who's a dueling

00:23:18.750 --> 00:23:22.320
piano performer is to know the audience.

00:23:22.320 --> 00:23:24.060
It's really not to be
the best piano player

00:23:24.060 --> 00:23:27.210
'cause most of my audience
was drunk and they don't care.

00:23:27.210 --> 00:23:29.050
You just have to be good enough.

00:23:29.050 --> 00:23:31.380
And it's really not
even to be a good singer

00:23:31.380 --> 00:23:32.550
because most of my audience,

00:23:32.550 --> 00:23:34.080
they wanna hear themselves sing.

00:23:34.080 --> 00:23:35.640
They're there to sing and participate.

00:23:35.640 --> 00:23:38.013
It's sort of like group karaoke in a way,

00:23:38.970 --> 00:23:40.530
but you gotta know the audience.

00:23:40.530 --> 00:23:43.620
You gotta be able to read the
room and know what they want.

00:23:43.620 --> 00:23:44.970
I had to be able to identify

00:23:44.970 --> 00:23:47.280
if a bachelorette party came in,

00:23:47.280 --> 00:23:49.800
what experience are they looking for?

00:23:49.800 --> 00:23:51.570
If a couple came in on a first date,

00:23:51.570 --> 00:23:53.040
what are they looking for?

00:23:53.040 --> 00:23:54.660
And I can pretty much pick out

00:23:54.660 --> 00:23:56.370
a couple on a first
date at this point now.

00:23:56.370 --> 00:23:58.620
At least in a piano bar setting.

00:23:58.620 --> 00:24:00.510
If a group came in,

00:24:00.510 --> 00:24:02.550
I have to identify who's the ring leader.

00:24:02.550 --> 00:24:04.080
Who's the one that brought the group here.

00:24:04.080 --> 00:24:05.490
'Cause that's how it always works.

00:24:05.490 --> 00:24:07.650
You don't just get 19
people together who all go,

00:24:07.650 --> 00:24:08.700
I love piano bars.

00:24:08.700 --> 00:24:09.600
Oh my God, me too.

00:24:09.600 --> 00:24:10.860
We should form a group.

00:24:10.860 --> 00:24:13.171
No, there's one person
in a group who says,

00:24:13.171 --> 00:24:14.970
hey, what if we all go to a piano bar,

00:24:14.970 --> 00:24:16.020
it's gonna be a blast.

00:24:16.020 --> 00:24:18.150
I love this place, come on, let's go.

00:24:18.150 --> 00:24:19.530
And so you have some of the group

00:24:19.530 --> 00:24:20.610
that are excited to be there.

00:24:20.610 --> 00:24:22.350
They love piano bars too.

00:24:22.350 --> 00:24:24.210
Some of that group,

00:24:24.210 --> 00:24:26.460
they're gonna gonna go
along for the ride and just,

00:24:26.460 --> 00:24:28.202
see where it goes.

00:24:28.202 --> 00:24:29.940
But they know that ultimately
they'll be at that bar

00:24:29.940 --> 00:24:31.350
for a little while and
then they'll head on

00:24:31.350 --> 00:24:33.780
the next place and just
keep the night moving.

00:24:33.780 --> 00:24:36.510
And then you have the one
or two people in that group,

00:24:36.510 --> 00:24:40.080
sort of the reluctant
few who are just waiting

00:24:40.080 --> 00:24:42.180
for an excuse to get out of there.

00:24:42.180 --> 00:24:43.380
They really don't want to be there.

00:24:43.380 --> 00:24:45.450
They don't even know
where they want to go.

00:24:45.450 --> 00:24:46.770
They're just part of this group though.

00:24:46.770 --> 00:24:48.060
So they go wherever the group goes

00:24:48.060 --> 00:24:49.710
and then hope they figure it out.

00:24:50.850 --> 00:24:55.850
And I realized that that
audience composition

00:24:55.890 --> 00:24:58.593
is not unique to piano bars.

00:24:59.610 --> 00:25:01.500
In every organization,

00:25:01.500 --> 00:25:03.060
there are three types of people.

00:25:03.060 --> 00:25:04.920
I know that there's
five you meet in heaven,

00:25:04.920 --> 00:25:05.880
but in your organization,

00:25:05.880 --> 00:25:06.990
in your professional organization,

00:25:06.990 --> 00:25:08.740
there's only three types of people.

00:25:09.845 --> 00:25:14.133
I call them keepers, leapers and sleepers.

00:25:15.540 --> 00:25:19.050
So your keepers are the people
who love what they're doing.

00:25:19.050 --> 00:25:21.990
They love who they do
it with and they love

00:25:21.990 --> 00:25:23.640
where they're doing it.

00:25:23.640 --> 00:25:25.500
That doesn't necessarily
mean geographically,

00:25:25.500 --> 00:25:27.570
but the organization itself.

00:25:27.570 --> 00:25:29.130
So let's say right industry,

00:25:29.130 --> 00:25:31.083
right colleagues, right company.

00:25:32.400 --> 00:25:35.490
They are your keepers and every
organization wants keepers.

00:25:35.490 --> 00:25:37.320
They want more keepers.

00:25:37.320 --> 00:25:39.390
I mean the conversations
I have with my clients

00:25:39.390 --> 00:25:43.740
are about retention and engagement
and discretionary effort,

00:25:43.740 --> 00:25:45.690
high performing, highly fulfilled people.

00:25:45.690 --> 00:25:48.190
That's what my clients
want in their organization.

00:25:49.740 --> 00:25:51.390
But there's two types of keepers.

00:25:52.650 --> 00:25:55.440
This is where my clients
have an aha moment generally,

00:25:55.440 --> 00:25:58.740
because they think about
their keepers as rock stars.

00:25:58.740 --> 00:26:03.333
And they are, many of them, but
keepers are also rock solid.

00:26:05.100 --> 00:26:06.300
So the rockstar is the one

00:26:06.300 --> 00:26:07.950
who's consistently crushing their quota,

00:26:07.950 --> 00:26:09.030
always looking to do more,

00:26:09.030 --> 00:26:11.520
wants to be promoted,
wants more responsibility,

00:26:11.520 --> 00:26:13.500
wants more initiative.

00:26:13.500 --> 00:26:18.500
But the rock solids,
they just love it here.

00:26:19.290 --> 00:26:21.300
They're not looking for a promotion.

00:26:21.300 --> 00:26:22.620
They're not looking to smash the ball

00:26:22.620 --> 00:26:24.030
out of the park every week.

00:26:24.030 --> 00:26:26.190
They want to know what you expect of them.

00:26:26.190 --> 00:26:28.050
And they're gonna deliver that.

00:26:28.050 --> 00:26:30.573
Nothing more, nothing less,

00:26:31.440 --> 00:26:33.450
but that consistency is important.

00:26:33.450 --> 00:26:34.530
You find that consistency

00:26:34.530 --> 00:26:37.067
in a lot of back office responsibilities,

00:26:37.067 --> 00:26:39.690
like engineering, maintenance, accounting,

00:26:39.690 --> 00:26:42.480
but those rock solids or rock steadies,

00:26:42.480 --> 00:26:43.590
whichever you wanna call it,

00:26:43.590 --> 00:26:45.240
those rock solid keepers,

00:26:45.240 --> 00:26:47.940
they're the ones that
you build a business on.

00:26:47.940 --> 00:26:50.790
The rock stars grow the business, yeah.

00:26:50.790 --> 00:26:51.960
And they ultimately go on

00:26:51.960 --> 00:26:54.450
to lead the business in many cases,

00:26:54.450 --> 00:26:56.640
but your keepers are a really important

00:26:56.640 --> 00:26:57.903
part of any business.

00:26:58.950 --> 00:27:00.350
So then we have our leapers.

00:27:02.280 --> 00:27:04.683
Leapers aren't showing up for a paycheck,

00:27:06.060 --> 00:27:09.270
but they also don't see
this job as their calling.

00:27:09.270 --> 00:27:12.090
They're showing up to
build career capital.

00:27:12.090 --> 00:27:13.620
They're showing up to build their resume.

00:27:13.620 --> 00:27:16.890
They may be working at
a small organization

00:27:16.890 --> 00:27:18.720
to get enough on their resume,

00:27:18.720 --> 00:27:21.210
that they can go apply
to that big sexy company

00:27:21.210 --> 00:27:23.490
they've always dreamed about working in.

00:27:23.490 --> 00:27:25.380
That's where they wanna be.

00:27:25.380 --> 00:27:26.940
They wanna leap to that big company

00:27:26.940 --> 00:27:30.030
or they could already be at a big company.

00:27:30.030 --> 00:27:33.360
And they're looking for a small
company where they can leap

00:27:33.360 --> 00:27:36.060
down and take a huge title.

00:27:36.060 --> 00:27:37.530
So maybe they are

00:27:37.530 --> 00:27:39.780
a senior manager at a technology firm.

00:27:39.780 --> 00:27:41.400
And they know if they go
to this small company,

00:27:41.400 --> 00:27:44.040
they could be the Chief
Technology Officer.

00:27:44.040 --> 00:27:45.210
- Yeah.

00:27:45.210 --> 00:27:48.870
- Leapers are very
often our most ambitious

00:27:48.870 --> 00:27:51.240
and our most skillful employee.

00:27:51.240 --> 00:27:52.530
But we do them a disservice

00:27:52.530 --> 00:27:55.020
by trying to convince them to stay.

00:27:55.020 --> 00:27:56.730
We have these retention initiatives

00:27:56.730 --> 00:27:58.020
because we want you to stay.

00:27:58.020 --> 00:27:59.770
Don't you see how great it is here.

00:28:00.900 --> 00:28:03.450
And the leaders don't know their audience.

00:28:03.450 --> 00:28:05.550
They're not here to stay.

00:28:05.550 --> 00:28:06.963
They're here to grow and go.

00:28:08.070 --> 00:28:09.670
Our job is to help them do that.

00:28:11.460 --> 00:28:15.480
And last, but certainly not
least, are our sleepers.

00:28:15.480 --> 00:28:18.690
And this is the group I
get the most excited about.

00:28:18.690 --> 00:28:20.310
This is the group that innovation experts

00:28:20.310 --> 00:28:22.770
call trapped value.

00:28:22.770 --> 00:28:24.813
I call them dormant talent.

00:28:25.890 --> 00:28:29.043
They're the people that aren't
really sure why they're here.

00:28:29.880 --> 00:28:30.900
And if you stopped paying them,

00:28:30.900 --> 00:28:32.490
they'd stop showing up.

00:28:32.490 --> 00:28:33.630
Because they're really just showing

00:28:33.630 --> 00:28:35.280
up every day for the paycheck.

00:28:35.280 --> 00:28:37.380
They're not giving discretionary effort.

00:28:37.380 --> 00:28:39.930
They're not looking for
additional responsibility.

00:28:39.930 --> 00:28:43.980
They probably aren't even
meeting the minimum standard

00:28:43.980 --> 00:28:46.130
right now that you have
as an organization.

00:28:47.190 --> 00:28:48.960
And in some cases,

00:28:48.960 --> 00:28:51.270
our job as a leader is to wake them up

00:28:51.270 --> 00:28:53.433
and help them find another place to sleep.

00:28:54.330 --> 00:28:56.373
Hopefully they engage there.

00:28:57.520 --> 00:28:59.670
But our job is simply
to show them the door,

00:28:59.670 --> 00:29:01.270
say, thank you for your service.

00:29:02.490 --> 00:29:07.490
But where we miss an opportunity
is in not connecting those

00:29:07.890 --> 00:29:11.790
sleepers with a purpose or with an impact

00:29:11.790 --> 00:29:13.920
that they can serve at our organization.

00:29:13.920 --> 00:29:16.590
Because very few people,

00:29:16.590 --> 00:29:20.040
there are some, I saw a TikTok
video of one the other day.

00:29:20.040 --> 00:29:23.430
Very few people take a job

00:29:23.430 --> 00:29:25.353
so they can torpedo the organization.

00:29:26.520 --> 00:29:28.230
Very few people take a job,

00:29:28.230 --> 00:29:31.320
so they can show up every
day and be miserable.

00:29:31.320 --> 00:29:34.440
We all, every single
person hearing my voice,

00:29:34.440 --> 00:29:36.570
we want to be happy.

00:29:36.570 --> 00:29:39.690
We want to enjoy the way we spend our day.

00:29:39.690 --> 00:29:41.850
Some of us may not believe it's possible,

00:29:41.850 --> 00:29:45.030
but I know that's what we
all want and you know it too.

00:29:45.030 --> 00:29:46.260
If you're listening and you hear my voice,

00:29:46.260 --> 00:29:48.210
you know that's true.

00:29:48.210 --> 00:29:50.250
Our job, our responsibility as leaders

00:29:50.250 --> 00:29:52.560
is to wake up those sleepers

00:29:52.560 --> 00:29:54.930
and connect them with a purpose.

00:29:54.930 --> 00:29:57.750
Show them the impact they can make.

00:29:57.750 --> 00:29:59.370
And when we do that,

00:29:59.370 --> 00:30:03.550
they turn into either keepers or leapers

00:30:04.770 --> 00:30:06.060
or they're out the door.

00:30:06.060 --> 00:30:07.803
But our job is to wake them up.

00:30:08.730 --> 00:30:11.460
And we've been calling these
people actively disengaged

00:30:11.460 --> 00:30:13.560
or disengaged or problem
employees, or God.

00:30:13.560 --> 00:30:15.840
I've heard some people
refer to them as cancers,

00:30:15.840 --> 00:30:17.670
and we gotta get rid of
them from our organization

00:30:17.670 --> 00:30:19.110
or else cancer spreads.

00:30:19.110 --> 00:30:20.973
One bad apple spoils the bunch.

00:30:22.320 --> 00:30:24.120
Well you let 'em in.

00:30:24.120 --> 00:30:26.763
So you gotta take responsibility
for waking them up.

00:30:28.590 --> 00:30:30.120
The interesting thing about leapers,

00:30:30.120 --> 00:30:31.870
if I can just go back for a second,

00:30:32.880 --> 00:30:36.670
is that it's sort of
counterintuitive to tell a leader

00:30:37.680 --> 00:30:42.420
to let a good employee go
or rather to help them go.

00:30:42.420 --> 00:30:47.370
But what happens when leapers
leap is they become a network

00:30:47.370 --> 00:30:49.170
for the company they left.

00:30:49.170 --> 00:30:52.290
They become a global brand ambassador.

00:30:52.290 --> 00:30:53.123
You don't know it.

00:30:53.123 --> 00:30:54.420
You didn't give them a pin or a badge,

00:30:54.420 --> 00:30:55.680
but that's what happened.

00:30:55.680 --> 00:30:57.630
They became a global brand ambassador.

00:30:57.630 --> 00:31:00.690
And in doing so everywhere they go,

00:31:00.690 --> 00:31:02.380
they will sing your praises

00:31:03.510 --> 00:31:05.760
because when they get to
that new organization,

00:31:05.760 --> 00:31:07.230
think maybe pre COVID here.

00:31:07.230 --> 00:31:09.150
But when they get to
that new organization,

00:31:09.150 --> 00:31:10.920
one of the first things
they do with their team

00:31:10.920 --> 00:31:13.680
is they all go to lunch
or they go to happy hour,

00:31:13.680 --> 00:31:16.860
or they sit around the
cafeteria or whatever.

00:31:16.860 --> 00:31:19.500
And they get to know the new employee.

00:31:19.500 --> 00:31:23.490
Now the Bureau of Labor Statistics
has said that on average

00:31:23.490 --> 00:31:27.450
people stay between two and
four years at an organization.

00:31:27.450 --> 00:31:29.880
That's sort of the
national average right now,

00:31:29.880 --> 00:31:30.843
here in the states.

00:31:32.070 --> 00:31:35.490
So there's a really good
bet that at that table where

00:31:35.490 --> 00:31:37.740
they're all meeting this new employee,

00:31:37.740 --> 00:31:39.780
some of the current employees

00:31:39.780 --> 00:31:41.610
are at the end of their four years.

00:31:41.610 --> 00:31:43.590
They're looking for their next leap.

00:31:43.590 --> 00:31:44.910
They're looking for that place to go.

00:31:44.910 --> 00:31:46.860
And when this employee,

00:31:46.860 --> 00:31:50.850
you're global brand ambassador
talks about how awesome it

00:31:50.850 --> 00:31:54.420
was to work for you
because you helped them

00:31:54.420 --> 00:31:56.883
get this job that they desperately wanted,

00:31:57.990 --> 00:31:58.980
that old employee,

00:31:58.980 --> 00:32:00.570
the one who may be looking to make a move,

00:32:00.570 --> 00:32:02.737
they call your phone and they say,

00:32:02.737 --> 00:32:06.930
"Hey, I heard you are an
incredible person to work for.

00:32:06.930 --> 00:32:09.330
I'd love to learn more
about your organization."

00:32:11.128 --> 00:32:12.158
So one of the challenges
that the businesses

00:32:12.158 --> 00:32:15.450
have right now is
retention and recruitment.

00:32:15.450 --> 00:32:16.920
How do I get people?

00:32:16.920 --> 00:32:19.680
Well, what if you let go of
the people that wanted to go?

00:32:19.680 --> 00:32:22.200
What if you actually helped
them get where they wanted to go

00:32:22.200 --> 00:32:25.470
and let those people become a network,

00:32:25.470 --> 00:32:27.333
a global network of recruiters,

00:32:28.380 --> 00:32:30.450
and some of them are gonna boomerang back.

00:32:30.450 --> 00:32:31.920
Some of them are gonna go and realize,

00:32:31.920 --> 00:32:34.410
you know, I actually really
did like it where I was,

00:32:34.410 --> 00:32:37.920
but they come back with
fresh perspective, new ideas,

00:32:37.920 --> 00:32:39.990
additional skills that
didn't have to pay for.

00:32:39.990 --> 00:32:42.450
They got it on somebody else's dime.

00:32:42.450 --> 00:32:46.042
So helping leapers leap is
a huge win for organizations

00:32:46.042 --> 00:32:47.730
and for the leaders within it.

00:32:47.730 --> 00:32:50.640
And then waking up the sleepers,

00:32:50.640 --> 00:32:52.350
activates this dormant talent.

00:32:52.350 --> 00:32:53.850
Talent that's already
in your organization.

00:32:53.850 --> 00:32:55.950
You don't have to pay extra for it.

00:32:55.950 --> 00:32:59.760
You just get more value for the
money you're already paying.

00:32:59.760 --> 00:33:03.270
And when leaders
understand how to identify

00:33:03.270 --> 00:33:05.490
and how to have a conversation

00:33:05.490 --> 00:33:07.860
with each of those category of employee

00:33:07.860 --> 00:33:10.200
and there are questions that you can ask.

00:33:10.200 --> 00:33:14.130
This is what I share with
my clients, these questions.

00:33:14.130 --> 00:33:16.530
When they understand their audience,

00:33:16.530 --> 00:33:19.263
they can deliver what I
call an encore performance.

00:33:20.160 --> 00:33:21.150
'Cause at the end of the day,

00:33:21.150 --> 00:33:23.550
that's what we all want from our employees

00:33:23.550 --> 00:33:24.963
and from our employers.

00:33:26.363 --> 00:33:27.196
We want an employer

00:33:27.196 --> 00:33:30.510
who creates a work
experience that's so great,

00:33:30.510 --> 00:33:32.550
I can't wait to go back in

00:33:32.550 --> 00:33:34.440
and I know some of you are
rolling your eyes going,

00:33:34.440 --> 00:33:36.033
yeah right Offner whatever.

00:33:39.150 --> 00:33:43.440
I dream of a world where people
are excited at the impact

00:33:43.440 --> 00:33:46.260
they get to make each
day when they go to work

00:33:46.260 --> 00:33:48.240
because you get to choose.

00:33:48.240 --> 00:33:49.620
It may not feel like you do,

00:33:49.620 --> 00:33:52.560
but you get to choose where you work.

00:33:52.560 --> 00:33:54.760
You get to choose what
you do with your day.

00:33:56.370 --> 00:34:01.170
Many of us have chosen
comfort and complacency.

00:34:01.170 --> 00:34:03.600
And I don't mean comfort,
like the lap of luxury.

00:34:03.600 --> 00:34:06.480
I mean, just enough to get by.

00:34:06.480 --> 00:34:07.953
Just comfortable enough.

00:34:09.180 --> 00:34:10.743
Just complacent enough.

00:34:11.610 --> 00:34:14.523
That reach to get what we
really want, it's scary.

00:34:15.900 --> 00:34:18.510
I know it's scary because I was that

00:34:18.510 --> 00:34:20.193
comfortable complacent person.

00:34:21.300 --> 00:34:26.300
I had a day job that was
okay, you know, good enough.

00:34:27.189 --> 00:34:28.320
And I had a night job,

00:34:28.320 --> 00:34:30.540
I mentioned earlier as a
dueling piano performer,

00:34:30.540 --> 00:34:33.393
which I loved, but let's be honest,

00:34:34.560 --> 00:34:36.960
a diet of ramen noodles is not my style.

00:34:36.960 --> 00:34:38.550
And you don't make a
whole heck a lot of money

00:34:38.550 --> 00:34:39.963
as a performer.

00:34:41.400 --> 00:34:46.380
And in 2015, I got news
from my vocal team,

00:34:46.380 --> 00:34:48.480
from doctors after a gig,

00:34:48.480 --> 00:34:50.100
I had been performing at a gig

00:34:50.100 --> 00:34:52.250
and I lost my voice
during the performance.

00:34:53.220 --> 00:34:54.600
And doctors said that my voice,

00:34:54.600 --> 00:34:59.040
my vocal chords were so badly
damaged that if I didn't take

00:34:59.040 --> 00:35:02.820
immediate action and make
dramatic lifestyle changes,

00:35:02.820 --> 00:35:04.443
I'd never speak again.

00:35:05.310 --> 00:35:07.740
At that time, they felt my
singing voice was gone forever.

00:35:07.740 --> 00:35:10.320
That was just gonna be a byproduct,

00:35:10.320 --> 00:35:12.210
a loss associated with the surgery

00:35:12.210 --> 00:35:14.460
that was gonna be needed
to save my vocal cords.

00:35:14.460 --> 00:35:17.070
But they thought if we acted
quickly and decisively,

00:35:17.070 --> 00:35:18.930
there was a chance that
I'd be able to regain

00:35:18.930 --> 00:35:19.983
my speaking voice.

00:35:21.660 --> 00:35:24.660
Over the better part of a decade,

00:35:24.660 --> 00:35:28.140
I'd go on to have 13
surgeries on my vocal cords,

00:35:28.140 --> 00:35:29.760
the ups and downs of recovery

00:35:29.760 --> 00:35:32.460
and complete silence as
my vocal cord healed.

00:35:32.460 --> 00:35:34.890
And then as I finally got some
semblance of a voice back,

00:35:34.890 --> 00:35:37.590
being able to speak
again, my vocal team said,

00:35:37.590 --> 00:35:40.470
okay, we're ready for the
next part of this procedure.

00:35:40.470 --> 00:35:42.450
I was in a deep depression

00:35:42.450 --> 00:35:45.180
at the midpoint of this experience.

00:35:45.180 --> 00:35:48.495
And when I started to take
inventory of what my life could

00:35:48.495 --> 00:35:52.863
have looked like if I had
simply made that reach,

00:35:54.420 --> 00:35:57.400
I became suicidal

00:35:59.370 --> 00:36:03.600
because I realized that someday we all do

00:36:03.600 --> 00:36:05.000
something for the last time.

00:36:06.540 --> 00:36:08.163
Maybe it's hugging our parents,

00:36:09.330 --> 00:36:11.190
maybe it's singing and performing.

00:36:11.190 --> 00:36:12.873
We don't know at that moment,

00:36:14.454 --> 00:36:17.310
but someday we're gonna do
something for the last time.

00:36:17.310 --> 00:36:21.453
And when I thought about
speaking for the last time,

00:36:22.920 --> 00:36:25.680
I was filled with regret
and disappointment,

00:36:25.680 --> 00:36:26.820
'cause I knew I wanted more.

00:36:26.820 --> 00:36:30.180
I was just scared 'cause I
was just comfortable enough.

00:36:30.180 --> 00:36:31.713
I was just complacent enough.

00:36:33.720 --> 00:36:35.250
And I know if you're listening to this,

00:36:35.250 --> 00:36:39.783
that it seems daunting
to make that change,

00:36:40.950 --> 00:36:44.520
but ask yourself what label feels best,

00:36:44.520 --> 00:36:45.360
the way I described it.

00:36:45.360 --> 00:36:47.820
Do you feel like you're
a keeper where you're at?

00:36:47.820 --> 00:36:50.250
Do you feel like you're a leaper?

00:36:50.250 --> 00:36:52.740
Do you feel like you're a sleeper?

00:36:52.740 --> 00:36:54.510
First know that's not a permanent label.

00:36:54.510 --> 00:36:56.040
It's just where you are right now.

00:36:56.040 --> 00:36:57.693
That can change day-to-day,

00:36:58.650 --> 00:37:00.000
but you've got to make a change.

00:37:00.000 --> 00:37:02.370
It begins with an honest
conversation with your manager,

00:37:02.370 --> 00:37:03.450
with your leader.

00:37:03.450 --> 00:37:05.400
And leaders, if you're listening to this,

00:37:05.400 --> 00:37:07.810
you owe your people
this honest conversation

00:37:09.030 --> 00:37:10.980
to say wherever you're at in your journey,

00:37:10.980 --> 00:37:13.830
keeper, leaper, sleeper, it's okay.

00:37:13.830 --> 00:37:16.920
My job is to help get
you where you want to be.

00:37:16.920 --> 00:37:19.980
Because as one of my mentors,
I mean I never met him,

00:37:19.980 --> 00:37:21.540
but I've read all his books
and listened to his tapes.

00:37:21.540 --> 00:37:25.057
One of my mentors, Zig
Zigler is fond of saying,

00:37:25.057 --> 00:37:27.600
"The secret to success in life

00:37:27.600 --> 00:37:30.600
is to help enough people
get what they want

00:37:30.600 --> 00:37:32.050
and you'll get what you want.

00:37:33.060 --> 00:37:35.880
So if I can leave the
audience with any message,

00:37:35.880 --> 00:37:38.010
it's chase impact,

00:37:38.010 --> 00:37:41.100
chase impact in what you do
and the income will follow.

00:37:41.100 --> 00:37:42.120
I promise.

00:37:42.120 --> 00:37:43.800
But if you're frustrated
and you feel like, oh,

00:37:43.800 --> 00:37:45.690
maybe I've been chasing income.

00:37:45.690 --> 00:37:47.280
This is your wake up call.

00:37:47.280 --> 00:37:49.350
Please start to chase impact

00:37:49.350 --> 00:37:52.770
and let's take the irk
out of work together.

00:37:52.770 --> 00:37:54.990
- I think that's a perfect transition

00:37:54.990 --> 00:37:58.710
into giving you an opportunity
to introduce yourself,

00:37:58.710 --> 00:38:01.620
introduce how people can
get in touch with you

00:38:01.620 --> 00:38:04.470
if they feel inspired by all of this.

00:38:04.470 --> 00:38:07.440
'Cause I know like I'm listening
and I'm just speechless,

00:38:07.440 --> 00:38:09.720
which doesn't happen to me very often.

00:38:09.720 --> 00:38:11.340
'Cause it was so much really good stuff.

00:38:11.340 --> 00:38:12.960
Everybody who knows me
knows that speechless

00:38:12.960 --> 00:38:17.960
is not my style, but
really great information.

00:38:18.000 --> 00:38:22.160
My brain is just running
with ideas on stuff.

00:38:22.160 --> 00:38:24.086
So if somebody else is feeling
inspired and they wanna reach

00:38:24.086 --> 00:38:26.730
out to you, what kind of stuff do you do?

00:38:26.730 --> 00:38:28.480
How can they get in touch with you?

00:38:29.700 --> 00:38:33.240
- Sure, so my full-time
job is a keynote speaker.

00:38:33.240 --> 00:38:36.900
I speak at conferences, I
speak for organizations.

00:38:36.900 --> 00:38:38.880
I travel internationally
and I'm on a mission

00:38:38.880 --> 00:38:41.310
to take the irk out of work.

00:38:41.310 --> 00:38:44.250
So leadership conferences,
general assemblies,

00:38:44.250 --> 00:38:45.753
annual kickoff meetings.

00:38:46.590 --> 00:38:48.180
I'm generally opening the conference

00:38:48.180 --> 00:38:50.130
and setting the tone for the experience

00:38:50.130 --> 00:38:52.307
or I'm closing the conference

00:38:52.307 --> 00:38:54.000
and really tying all of the content

00:38:54.000 --> 00:38:55.800
that the attendees have
learned up with a nice,

00:38:55.800 --> 00:38:58.530
pretty bow so that they
leave excited and inspired

00:38:58.530 --> 00:39:01.480
and hopefully they are inspired
to take the irk outta work.

00:39:02.670 --> 00:39:04.980
Because of what I do, I have a website,

00:39:04.980 --> 00:39:06.870
never thought I'd say that,
but I've got a website.

00:39:06.870 --> 00:39:08.520
So it's gregoryoffner.com.

00:39:08.520 --> 00:39:10.200
I'd love for you to go and check it out.

00:39:10.200 --> 00:39:11.700
I'm easy to reach.

00:39:11.700 --> 00:39:14.016
I'm on all the major socials.

00:39:14.016 --> 00:39:18.090
LinkedIn and Instagram are
generally my two main jams.

00:39:18.090 --> 00:39:20.763
But if you're listening
to this and you're moved,

00:39:21.690 --> 00:39:24.990
inspired, hell, even if you're disgusted,

00:39:24.990 --> 00:39:27.000
reach out and let me
know what you thought.

00:39:27.000 --> 00:39:29.584
Let me know what's resonating with you

00:39:29.584 --> 00:39:31.920
and if I can help you, I will.

00:39:31.920 --> 00:39:33.240
I read every message.

00:39:33.240 --> 00:39:34.260
I read every email.

00:39:34.260 --> 00:39:36.720
I don't have a cadre of people

00:39:36.720 --> 00:39:38.220
that are between me and somebody who wants

00:39:38.220 --> 00:39:41.059
to say hi, like I'm very approachable.

00:39:41.059 --> 00:39:42.750
So, I'd love the opportunity
to connect with anyone

00:39:42.750 --> 00:39:45.810
who's interested and
learn about your story.

00:39:45.810 --> 00:39:46.643
- Awesome.

00:39:46.643 --> 00:39:47.850
- Thank you for sharing that.

00:39:47.850 --> 00:39:49.904
And thank you for coming on today

00:39:49.904 --> 00:39:50.737
and sharing so many great insights.

00:39:50.737 --> 00:39:53.493
This has been like
truly thought provoking.

00:39:54.930 --> 00:39:55.950
- Oh, that's awesome, Christina.

00:39:55.950 --> 00:39:57.151
Thanks for giving the opportunity.

00:39:57.151 --> 00:39:58.701
It's so it's been a lot of fun.

00:39:59.730 --> 00:40:01.170
- And entrepreneurs, if you wanna learn

00:40:01.170 --> 00:40:03.480
from other great experts
just like Gregory,

00:40:03.480 --> 00:40:06.450
head over to etatoday.zone and get lots

00:40:06.450 --> 00:40:07.890
of great tips to help you build a business

00:40:07.890 --> 00:40:09.060
that enables your lifestyle

00:40:09.060 --> 00:40:10.380
instead of taking over your life.

00:40:10.380 --> 00:40:11.430
Until next time, bye.

00:40:16.006 --> 00:40:18.589
(upbeat music)

About Christina Hooper

I help you turn your Superpowers into Sales so you can build a business that enables your lifestyle instead of taking over your life. I'm also StoryBrand Certified Guide, BMS Certified Coach, and DigitalMarketer Certified Partner.

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